Ungulate Migration Patterns
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We welcome your exploration of the Database and Viewer, which we have released in a beta version in order to gather feedback. We ask for your patience as we continue to develop tools and enhance the usability and functionality of the viewer. The viewer will be in flux over the next 8 months, and you can expect to see many improvements as you revisit the site. Comments are welcome and encouraged at the contacts provided. Although datasets for Wyoming studies are listed not all datasets are currently available for detailed exploration.

Please enter you Email Address. We will not share/sell this information to anyone. We will only use it to send you updates and to monitor the application.


ACCESS LEVELS OF INDIVIDUAL DATASETS:
The Wyoming Migration Initiative has established various access levels for datasets within the Migration Viewer. This approach protects researcher ownership of their data, while also allowing wildlife managers, professionals and the general public access to important datasets,. Contributing researchers and their funders have made large investments of time and resources in these datasets, and so it is important to protect the integrity of their research. Access levels for specific datasets are set by the data owner, not the WMI. For this reason, you may experience different functionality while viewing different datasets. Our goal is to allow all users access to as much data as possible. When the Migration Viewer is complete, it will provide agency managers and wildlife professionals the ability to run simple analyses that aid their management work, such as what animals are in a given hunt/herd unit at a certain time of year. Some data owners, have allowed the public to have full access to a handful of individual but limited access to larger datasets. If you have further questions or would like to gain access at a different level, please contact us at info@migrationinitiative.org.
2014-04-28 17:45
The Wyoming Migration Initiative has established various access levels for datasets within the Migration Viewer. This approach protects researcher ownership of their data, while also allowing wildlife managers, professionals and the general public access to important datasets,. Contributing researchers and their funders have made large investments of time and resources in these datasets, and so it is important to protect the integrity of their research. Access levels for specific datasets are set by the data owner, not the WMI. For this reason, you may experience different functionality while viewing different datasets. Our goal is to allow all users access to as much data as possible. When the Migration Viewer is complete, it will provide agency managers and wildlife professionals the ability to run simple analyses that aid their management work, such as what animals are in a given hunt/herd unit at a certain time of year. Some data owners, have allowed the public to have full access to a handful of individual but limited access to larger datasets. If you have further questions or would like to gain access at a different level, please contact us at info@migrationinitiative.org.

Users, data, and functionality are each divided into five categories:
  • Public
  • Professional
  • Manager 1
  • Manager 2
  • Manager 3
In general the amount of access is least for the Public and increases as you move to Manager 3.
Species:

# Animals:
Predators can influence prey populations in both direct and indirect ways – both by killing them and by changing their behavior. Much of our recent work has focused on indirect pathways, and seeks to understand the ways in which the predation risk from wolves influences antipredator behavior in elk. Previous work has evaluated how landscape heterogeneity creates gradients in the risk of wolf predation on elk in Yellowstone National Park, and we are also evaluating the behavioral basis of elk antipredator behavior (i.e., vigilance, movement, grouping). These investigations include examination of the potential community-level effects of predation risk, specifically so-called ‘behaviorally mediated trophic cascades’ involving wolves, elk and aspen. A current study, the Absaroka Elk Ecology Project, is evaluating factors that might influence the strength of elk antipredator behavior in response to wolves. We are particularly interested in elucidating the manner in which prey body condition mediates – and is mediated by – the strength of antipredator behavior.
Author(s): Scott Becker & Matthew Dauffman
Project Dates: 02/16/2005 - 02/17/2007
Contact Information:
Matthew Kauffman
Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
University of Wyoming
Laramie WY 82071

email: mkauffm1@uwyo.edu

To obtain raw data or more specific information on the dataset use the contact listed above. For problems, comments, or suggestions on the use of the Viewer please email info@migrationinitiative.org

Wyoming Game & Fish Department
Wyoming Animal Damage Management Board
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
Wyoming Governor’s Big Game License Coalition
Sportsmen for Fish & Wildlife · U.S. Forest Service - Shoshone National Forest
Boone & Crocket Club
University of Wyoming - National Park Service Research Station